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Sanitary Engineering Notice

The Septic System and Water Well Programs are working with reduced services during the COVID-19 pandemic. In an effort to serve the needs of the county residents, the review and approval of permits is being conducted on a limited basis. For more information, call Perc Testing: 410-222-7193, Septic Installations: 410-222-7194 or Water Wells: 410-222-7398.

Effective June 22, the department will expand percolation testing beyond the repair of failing onsite sewage disposal systems, currently being performed. Perc tests for additions and new construction will resume, as well as site inspections for limited home additions and verification of existing systems.

For properties that submitted a perc application before April 1, 2020, call the Sanitary Engineering Program at 410-222-7193 to verify if the planned perc test is wet season restricted. Scheduling testing is the responsibility of the applicant or owner, who should contact the sanitarian serving their property’s location. Area sanitarian phone numbers are available at Perc Testing Areas.

How To Disinfect Your Well Water After A Flood

Last updated: June 8, 2018

If your well becomes submerged due to flooding, it may have become contaminated with bacteria. The Department of Health recommends disinfecting the water in wells that have been submerged. If you notice a change in taste, odor, color or appearance, it is recommended that you use bottled water.

Follow these steps to disinfect (chlorinate) your well water.

  1. Prior to chlorination, draw off enough water for about 24 hours of household use not for drinking, but for flushing the toilet. Bypass any water conditioning equipment.
  2. Remove the well cap, and pour 1 gallon of bleach into the well. (NOTE: Dug wells require 2 gallons of bleach.)
  3. Connect a garden hose to an outside tap. Place the hose inside the well. Turn the water on at the outside tap, and allow the water to circulate for 2 hours. Turn the water off, remove the hose, and replace the well cap.
  4. Run water through each tap in the house. Immediately turn off the tap after detecting a strong chlorine odor or milky water. Allow the chlorinated water to remain in the plumbing system for at least 24 hours.
  5. Then, run the water from an outside tap through a garden hose until the chlorine odor has completely disappeared.
  6. Removal of chlorinated water from the well may take 2 to 3 days. Follow-up bacteriological testing is recommended by a state certified private laboratory. For a listing of state certified private laboratories, visit the Maryland Department of Health’s website, or contact the Anne Arundel County Department of Health at 410-222-7189 or Contact Us.

CAUTION:

DO NOT RUN THE CHLORINATED WATER INTO YOUR SEPTIC SYSTEM, AS IT MAY OVERLOAD ITS CAPACITY.

DO NOT USE THE HEAVILY CHLORINATED WATER FOR BATHING, LAUNDERING AND WASHING STERLING SILVER.

IF YOU HAVE A WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM, CONTACT YOUR WATER CONDITIONING COMPANY BEFORE RECONNECTING. WELL CHLORINATIONS INTRODUCE HIGH LEVELS OF CHLORINE THAT COULD DAMAGE YOUR SYSTEM.

For more information, contact:
Well Construction & Water Quality Program
Anne Arundel County Department of Health
3 Harry S. Truman Parkway
Annapolis, Maryland 21401
410-222-7189

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Anne Arundel County Department of Health | 3 Harry S. Truman Parkway Annapolis, Maryland 21401
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